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Author Topic: NASA Finds Huge Rainfall Totals from Typhoon Melor Over Philippines  (Read 209 times)

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Hollywood

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http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/melor-nw-pacific-ocean
Quote
Melor (NW Pacific Ocean)
NASA Finds Huge Rainfall Totals from Typhoon Melor Over Philippines


NASA'S Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data collected from December 12 to 17, 2015 were used to update Typhoon Melor's rainfall totals. The central Philippines received the largest amount of rainfall that measured almost three feet.

The highest rainfall totals during this five day period were still found along the typhoon's path in the central Philippines where rainfall totals were now measured by IMERG at over 899 mm (35.4 inches). Heavy rain totaling over 771 mm (30.4 inches) fell over northeastern Luzon.
Credits: NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

Northern Luzon escaped the damaging winds of Typhoon Melor but moisture transported by the tropical cyclone caused flooding rainfall in that area. IMERG data showed that much of Luzon was found to have rainfall totals of over 200 mm (7.9 inches) during this period. Unexpectedly heavy rain totaling over 771 mm (30.4 inches) fell over northeastern Luzon. The highest rainfall totals during this five day period were still found along the typhoon's path in the central Philippines where rainfall totals were now measured by IMERG at over 899 mm (35.4 inches).

The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) creates a merged precipitation product from the GPM constellation of satellites. These satellites include DMSPs from the U.S. Department of Defense, GCOM-W from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Megha-Tropiques from the Centre National D’etudies Spatiales (CNES) and Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), NOAA series from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Suomi-NPP from NOAA-NASA, and MetOps from the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). 

All of the instruments (radiometers) onboard the constellation partners are intercalibrated with information from the GPM Core Observatory’s GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR).

After crossing the northern and central Philippines and emerging in the South China Sea on Thursday, December 17, Melor dissipated over the waters of South China Sea.

Dec. 18, 2015 - NASA Looks at Tropical Cyclone Melor's Rainfall and Dissipation

When Tropical Storm Melor was raining on Luzon in the northern Philippines, the GPM satellite analyzed the rainfall rate. The next day, NASA's Terra satellite caught a look at Melor after it moved off-shore and weakened into a trough of low pressure.
NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite had a good view of Tropical Storm Melor on December 16, 2015 at 0956 UTC (4:56 a.m. EST). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed that moisture from Tropical Storm Melor was spreading over the northern Philippine island of Luzon. Very little rain was found at the location of Melor's center of circulation but light to moderate precipitation was shown falling over Luzon. Even more intense showers were seen dropping rain at a rate of over 50 mm (almost 2 inches) per hour off the northeastern coast of Luzon.

The next day, Melor moved away from Luzon and headed in a southwesterly direction in the South China Sea and away from the Philippines. On Dec. 17 at 0300 UTC (Dec. 16 at 10 p.m. EST) Melor was downgraded to a depression. Melor's maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). At that time it was centered near 12.8 degrees north latitude and 118.5 degrees east longitude, about 145 nautical miles west-southwest of Manila, Philippines. Melor has tracked south-southwestward at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that "animated multispectral satellite imagery and recent microwave imagery showed an open trough (elongated area of low pressure) with no discernable low level circulation center."

On Dec. 17, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Storm Melor, which resembled an elongated low pressure area.

JTWC issued their final bulletin on the storm and said that Melor is not expected to regenerate as the remnants move through the South China Sea.

Dec. 16, 2015 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Melor Affecting Northern Philippines

As Typhoon Melor weakened to a tropical storm as it moved through the islands of the Philippines, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm on Dec. 16.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Melor, known locally as Nona, on Dec. 16 at 0500 UTC (12 a.m. EST).  The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard Aqua captured a visible image of the weaker storm and the center of circulation was difficult to pinpoint because of strong wind shear affecting the system.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that strong vertical winds shear between 30 to 40 knots continues to decouple the low and upper level features. A tropical cyclone is like a stack of rotating tires. If one of the tires is pushed out of the stack, the rotation becomes wobbly, weaker and slower. That's what vertical wind shear does to different layers of a tropical cyclone.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Tropical storm Melor was centered near 16.0 degrees north latitude and 119.4 degrees east longitude, about 125 nautical miles (143.8 miles/231.5 km) northwest of Manila, Philippines. Melor was moving to the north at 7 knots (8 mph/12.9 kph) and maximum sustained winds were down to 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph).

Philippine warnings were still in effect as Melor continued to move through Luzon. Public storm warning signal #2 was in effect in the following Luzon provinces: Bataan, Southern Zambales, Cavite, Batangas and Lubang Island. Public storm warning signal #1 was in effect in the following provinces: Luzon: Metro Manila, rest of Zambales, Pampanga, Bulacan, Tarlac, Rizal, Laguna, Northern Occidental Mindoro and Northern Oriental Mindoro.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Melor's center is over the South China Sea, and will move north parallel to the Luzon coast before turning to the southwest. Melor is expected to then weaken quickly over the South China Sea as it encounters cooler waters, dry air and continues to deal with wind shear.

Much more at the Original Page.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2015, 01:02:59 pm by Hollywood »
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